seagull

navigate by keyword : adult being bills birds black born calls carnivores closely coastal colonies composed consume crabs dark densely dialects down eggs family feet fish food genera genus grey ground gull gulls harsh hatching head headed herring includes inland laridae lay maximum medium mottled nest nesting nests noisy opportunistically packed plumage precocial prey scavenge sea seabirds seagull seagulls several speckled squawking stout terns three typical vegetation waders webbed white wings young

Seagull Royalty Free Stock Photo
Seagull silhouette on sunset, Adriatic sea in Croatia, taken from Island Lokrum near Dubrovnik Royalty Free Stock Photo
Seagull Royalty Free Stock Photo
Seagull Royalty Free Stock Photo
Seagull on a rock Royalty Free Stock Photo
Seagull in Flight Royalty Free Stock Photo
Seagull Royalty Free Stock Photo
Seagull
Seagull on Pole Royalty Free Stock Photo
Seagull flying above frozen sea Royalty Free Stock Photo
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Seagull Crossing Royalty Free Stock Photo
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Flying Seagull on the sky Royalty Free Stock Photo
Seagull Royalty Free Stock Photo
Gulls or seagulls are seabirds of the family Laridae in the suborder Lari. They are most closely related to the terns and only distantly related to auks, skimmers, and more distantly to the waders. Until the 21st century, most gulls were placed in the genus Larus, but this arrangement is now known to be polyphyletic, leading to the resurrection of several genera. this term can still be found in certain regional dialects. Gulls are typically medium to large birds, usually grey or white, often with black markings on the head or wings. They typically have harsh wailing or squawking calls, stout, longish bills, and webbed feet. Most gulls, particularly Larus species, are ground-nesting carnivores, which take live food or scavenge opportunistically. Live food often includes crabs and small fish. Gulls have unhinging jaws which allow them to consume large prey. Apart from the kittiwakes, gulls are typically coastal or inland species, rarely venturing far out to sea. The large species take up to four years to attain full adult plumage, but two years is typical for small gulls. Large white-headed gulls are typically long-lived birds, with a maximum age of 49 years recorded for the herring gull. Gulls nest in large, densely packed noisy colonies. They lay two or three speckled eggs in nests composed of vegetation. The young are precocial, being born with dark mottled down, and mobile upon hatching.


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