the bearded vulture gypaetus barbatus

navigate by keyword : alps barbatus beak beard bearded bone breaker breeds carcasses claws crags eagle feathers gypaetus lammergeier marrow meat mustache ossifrage plumage raptors rostrum rotting scavengers vulture

Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) Royalty Free Stock Photo
Lammergeier, Bearded Vulture, Gypaetus barbatus Royalty Free Stock Photo
Bearded Vulture, Gypaetus barbatus, detail portrait of rare mountain bird, sitting on the rock, animal in stone habitat, Morocco Royalty Free Stock Photo
Bearded Vulture, Gypaetus barbatus, detail portrait of rare mountain bird, in stone habitat, Spain Royalty Free Stock Photo
Bearded Vulture, Gypaetus barbatus, in stone habitat, detail bill portrait, Spain Royalty Free Stock Photo
Bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus). Royalty Free Stock Photo
Bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), Alpine bird of prey sitting Royalty Free Stock Photo
The Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus)
Bearded Vulture, Gypaetus barbatus, in stone habitat, Spain Royalty Free Stock Photo
Bearded vulture - Gypaetus barbatus in the wild Royalty Free Stock Photo
An endangered bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus)with the small Royalty Free Stock Photo
Bearded vulture, gypaetus barbatus Royalty Free Stock Photo
Young Bearded Vulture, Gypaetus barbatus born at the zoo will be released to the wild Royalty Free Stock Photo
Bearded vulture, gypaetus barbatus Royalty Free Stock Photo
Lammergeier, Bearded Vulture, Gypaetus barbatus Royalty Free Stock Photo
The Lammergeier or Bearded Vulture-Eagle (Gypaetus barbatus) is an Old World vulture, the only member of the genus Gypaetus. It breeds on crags in high mountains in southern Europe, Africa, India and Tibet. The Lammergeier has been successfully re-introduced into the Alps, but is still one of the rarest raptors in Europe. Like other vultures it is a scavenger, feeding mostly from carcasses of dead animals. It usually disdains the rotting meat, however, and lives on a diet that is 90% bone marrow. It will drop large bones from a height to crack them into smaller pieces. Its old name of Ossifrage (bone breaker) relates to this habit.


Stockphotos.ro (c) 2016. All stock photos are provided by Dreamstime and are copyrighted by their respective owners.